Elbląg

It is the capital of Elbląg County and has been assigned (since 1999) to the Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship. mehr

German Empire

The only minority language with a significant number of speakers (5.4%) was Polish (a figure that rises to over 6% when including the related Kashubian and Masurian languages). mehr

Masuria

It has been the part of East Prussia inhabited by Polish-speaking, Lutheran Masurians. Masuria occupies much of the Masurian Lake District (). Administratively, it belongs to Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship (). mehr

Poland

These lake districts are the Pomeranian Lake District, the Greater Polish Lake District, the Kashubian Lake District, and the Masurian Lake District. The Masurian Lake District is the largest of the four and covers much of north-eastern Poland. mehr

Warmia

It is nowadays the core of the Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship. mehr

Warmia

At the Yalta Conference and Potsdam Conference of 1945, the victorious Allies divided East Prussia into the two parts now known as Oblast Kaliningrad (in Russia) and the Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship (in Poland). mehr

Warmia

The majority of present inhabitants of Warmia are descendants of Poles who either were Warmiaks or migrated there from other parts of Poland, including the pre-1939 Polish Borderlands, after 1945. Olsztyn is the largest city in Warmia and the capital of the Warmian-Masurian Voivedeship. During 1945-46, Warmia was part of the "Okreg Mazurski" (Masurian District). In 1946 a new voivodeship was created and named the Olsztyn Voivodeship, which encompassed both Warmia and Masurian counties. In 1975 this voivodeship was redistricted and survived in this form until the new redistricting and renaming in 1999 as Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship. mehr

Paul von Hindenburg

Hindenburg's Eighth Army was victorious in the Battle of Tannenberg and the Battle of the Masurian Lakes against the Russian armies. mehr

Masovian Voivodeship

It is bordered by six other voivodeships: Warmian-Masurian to the north, Podlaskie to the north-east, Lublin to the south-east, Świętokrzyskie to the south, Łódź to the south-west, and Kuyavian-Pomeranian to the north-west. mehr

Olsztyn

Olsztyn is the capital of the Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship, and is a city with powiat rights. mehr

Olsztyn

Olsztyn became the capital of the Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship in 1999. It was previously in the Olsztyn Voivodeship. mehr

Olsztyn

In 1945 the whole castle became home to the Masurian Museum, which today is called the Museum of Warmia and Masuria. mehr

Battle of Tannenberg

A series of follow-up battles (First Masurian Lakes) destroyed most of the First Army as well and kept the Russians off balance until the spring of 1915. The battle is particularly notable for fast rail movements by the Germans, enabling them to concentrate against each of the two Russian armies in turn, and also for the failure of the Russians to encode their radio messages. mehr

Battle of Tannenberg

It set the stage for the First Battle of the Masurian Lakes a week later, when the reinforced German Eighth Army confronted the Russian First Army. mehr

Frombork

"Frombork" () is a town in northern Poland, on the Vistula Lagoon, in Braniewo County, Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship. mehr

East Prussia

Despite early success and the capture of the towns of Rastenburg and Gumbinnen, in the Battle of Tannenberg in 1914 and the Second Battle of the Masurian Lakes in 1915, the Russians were decisively defeated and forced to retreat. mehr

East Prussia

The borders of the present-day Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship in Poland correspond closely to those of southern East Prussia. mehr

Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship

These are Pomeranian Voivodeship to the north, Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship to the north-east, Masovian Voivodeship to the east, Łódź Voivodeship across a short boundary to the south, and Greater Poland Voivodeship to the south and west. mehr

Pomeranian Voivodeship

The voivodeship was established on January 1, 1999, out of the former voivodeships of Gdańsk, Elbląg and Słupsk, pursuant to the Polish local government reforms adopted in 1998. It is bordered by West Pomeranian Voivodeship to the west, Greater Poland and Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeships to the south, Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship to the east, and the Baltic Sea to the north. mehr

Smolensk

It was subsequently transferred to the 10th Army and fought at the Second Battle of the Masurian Lakes. mehr

Braniewo

"Braniewo" (former German name: Braunsberg) is a town in northeastern Poland, in the Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship, with a population of 18,068 (2004). mehr

Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship

"Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship" or "Warmia-Masuria Province" (in , ), is a voivodeship (province) in northeastern Poland. mehr

Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship

The Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship was created on January 1, 1999, from the entire Olsztyn Voivodeship, the western half of Suwałki Voivodeship and part of Elbląg Voivodeship, pursuant to the Polish local government reforms adopted in 1998. The province's name derives from two historic regions, Warmia and Masuria. mehr

Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship

The Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship has the largest number of ethnic Ukrainians living in Poland due to forced relocations (such as Operation Vistula) carried out by the Soviet and Polish Communist authorities. mehr

Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship

Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship is divided into 21 counties (powiats): 2 city counties and 19 land counties. mehr

Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship

The Łuknajno Lake nature reserve (part of Masurian Landscape Park) is a protected wetland site under the Ramsar convention, as well as being designated by UNESCO as a biosphere reserve. mehr

Hermann von François

When Hindenburg and Ludendorff went south to lead the 9th Army in Russian Poland, François remained with his corps in East Prussia and led it with much success in the First Battle of the Masurian Lakes the following month. mehr

Masurians

The "Masurians" or "Mazurs" (, ) were a Lechitic sub-ethnic group in the Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship in Poland. In the 19th century, the Masuria region of East Prussia was named after the Masurians. mehr

Prussia (region)

Since the military conquest by the Soviet Army in 1945 and the expulsion of the inhabitants it divided between northern Poland (most of the Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship), Russia's Kaliningrad exclave, and southwestern Lithuania (Klaipėda Region). mehr

Elbląg Voivodeship

"Elbląg Voivodeship" () was a unit of administrative division and local government in Poland from 1975 to 1998, superseded by the Pomeranian Voivodeship and the Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship. mehr

Suwałki Voivodeship

"Suwałki Voivodeship" () was an administrative division and local government in Poland from 1975 to 1998. In 1999 the Voidvodeship was divided in half and reassigned to two other Voivodeships – the eastern half to Podlaskie Voivodeship and the western half to Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship. mehr

Olsztyn Voivodeship

"Olsztyn Voivodeship" () was an administrative division and unit of local government in Poland in the years 1745-75, and a new territorial division between 1975–1998, superseded by Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship. mehr

Mrągowo

"Mrągowo" (until 1947 ) is a town in the Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship of northeastern Poland, the capital of Mrągowo County and the seat (though not part of) the Gmina Mrągowo. It is located within the Masurian Lake District, about east of Olsztyn. mehr

Bartoszyce

It is the capital of Bartoszyce County within the Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship. mehr

Bartoszyce

The town, renamed Bartoszyce, was in Olsztyn Voivodeship from 1975-1998. It became part of the Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship in 1999. mehr

Szczytno

Szczytno is situated in the Warmian-Masurian Voivodship (since 1999), but was previously in Olsztyn Voivodship (1975-1998). mehr

Kętrzyn

Situated in the Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship (since 1999), Kętrzyn was previously in Olsztyn Voivodeship (1975–1998). mehr

Kętrzyn

Rastenburg and the surrounding district was the scene of the First World War's First and Second Battles of the Masurian Lakes. mehr

Iława

It is situated in the Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship (since 1999); previously it was in Olsztyn Voivodeship (1975–1998). mehr

Ostróda

"Ostróda" () is a town in Ostróda County in the Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship in Poland, with 33,191 inhabitants as of December 31, 2009. It lies in the Masurian Lake District and is a growing tourist site owing to its relaxing natural surroundings. mehr

Ostróda

While it was previously in Olsztyn Voivodeship from 1975 to 1998, Ostróda has been situated in the Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship since 1999. mehr

Ełk

It was assigned to Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship in 1999, after belonging to Suwałki Voivodeship from 1975 to 1998. Ełk is the capital of Ełk County. mehr

Giżycko

It is situated between Lake Mamry and Lake Niegocin, and has been within the Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship since 1999, having previously been in the Suwałki Voivodeship (1975–1998). mehr

Giżycko

The town was renamed "Giżycko" in 1946 in honor of the Masurian folklorist Gustaw Gizewiusz, a 19th-century Evangelical-Lutheran pastor in southern East Prussia, who had greatly supported Polish language and Polish culture. mehr

Działdowo

Situated in the Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship (since 1999), Działdowo belonged previously to Ciechanów Voivodeship (1975–1998). mehr

Działdowo

In 1912 the Germans introduced the terms "Masurs" and "Masurian language" instead of "Pole" and "Polish language" in the census in the area. mehr

Łyna River

The "Łyna" (), or "Lava" (), is a river in northern Poland's Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship as well as in Russia's Kaliningrad Oblast. mehr

Łyna River

It is connected to Lake Mamry by the 18th-century Masurian Canal. mehr

Stębark

"Stębark" () is a village in the administrative district of Gmina Grunwald, within Ostróda County, Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship, in northern Poland. mehr

Lidzbark Warmiński

"Lidzbark Warmiński" () is a town in the Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship in Poland. mehr
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